Fungusloci in Stroud; growing mushrooms in coffee grounds!

Posted on 12. Apr, 2015 by in Business, Featured, Food & Drink

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2015 Nominations-Best Local Business filmWe are delighted to note that this film has been nominated by the public as one of the best Stroud Business films in 2015. See more about Stroud Community TV Awards 2015 here.

See also art exhibition at the farm: last day 18th April 2015 – see more at: http://stroudcommunity.tv/mycoculture/

CSCIC director, artist and mushroom enthusiast Dominic Thomas has created Fungusloci, Gloucestershire’s first urban mushroom micro farm where oyster mushrooms will be cultivated on waste coffee grounds from local cafes.

The Fungusloci micro farm is based in an empty retail space in Stroud town centre and is aiming to process over one hundred kilograms of waste coffee a week, using it as a growing medium for delicious and healthy oyster mushrooms. The mushrooms will be sold via local food retailers (including the Farmer’s Market and Stroudco), local cafes and restaurants who are all keen to add locally grown gourmet mushrooms to their menus and produce lists.

Stroud’s town centre cafes have embraced the chance to divert their waste coffee from landfill to produce oyster mushrooms. Fungusloci have begun collecting from two cafes, Star Anise and Mills. As production expands, coffee will be collected on a daily basis from more town centre cafes by bicycle and trailer.

As well as producing sustainable local food the project aims to be an educational resource, promoting sustainable business models and opening up the marvellous world of fungi and mycology to both adults and children.

The Fungusloci project has been working in partnership with SVA (Stroud Valleys Artspace) and Stroud Brewery and has received funding though the Stroud District Local Food Grants scheme.

See more about the project at: http://www.cscic.org/info/our-project…

And more about StroudCo at: http://www.stroudco.org.uk/

Miraculous mushrooms

– article in StroudCo by Nick Weir (with kind permission to reprint here)

A small miracle is happening in what was, until recently, a vacant shop in the Merrywalks centre. Go and have a look in the window of Unit 23 – just down from King Street on your left. You will see some cylindrical sacks of aging coffee grounds hanging in the shop window sprouting oyster mushrooms.

Stroud based artist and mushroom enthusiast Dominic Thomas has created Fungusloci which is Gloucestershire’s first urban mushroom micro farm where Oyster mushrooms are cultivated on waste coffee grounds. I was lucky enough to see the workings of the farm last week. If you missed it you can see it on www.stroudcommunity.tv/fungusloci/ (this page!)

Fungusloci mushroom farm will divert tons of commercial waste from landfill, using the coffee grounds from local cafes as the growing medium for producing highly-prized, nutritious Oyster mushrooms. Not only is a healthy food produced from this waste, but at the end of the growing process the coffee grounds become a top quality compost, that can go back into the ground and help produce other local foodstuffs.

The mushrooms will be sold through Stroudco and the farmers market and to local cafes and restaurants (including those who contributed the waste coffee grounds) who are all keen to add locally-grown gourmet mushrooms to their menus and produce lists.
Fungusloci have begun collecting from two cafes, Star Anise and Mills. As production expands, coffee will be collected on a daily basis from more town centre cafes by bicycle and trailer. At the heart of this new town centre enterprise is a sustainable production process, using little energy and having low environmental impact. An infrastructure has been created that is portable and could be replicated elsewhere.
Dominic Thomas, Fungusloci’s founder says; ‘the world of fungi is mysterious and fascinating. I have been studying them for many years. I started growing oyster mushrooms using my own coffee grounds three years ago. Oysters are particularly satisfying and exciting, because they can be cultivated on a variety of waste products, and can fruit in as little as six weeks. There is no waste – when the mushrooms are harvested the coffee has become a rich garden compost.’
Dominic has studied mycology and cultivating exotic mushrooms on a domestic scale for 10 years. He offers educational talks and workshops, guided walks, home growing kits, and works with schools and community groups on mushroom-related projects. Contact Dominic on fungus@cscic.org or 07815448870 or 01453 767896
Fresh oyster mushrooms are both delicious and healthy. They are high in protein and B vitamins, low in fats and salt, and contain cholesterol-lowering compounds. Growing Oyster mushrooms on spent coffee grounds is a tried and tested method that has been pioneered and developed by organisations across Europe and America. Until now, there have been no producers of Oyster mushrooms in Gloucestershire.
As you will see if you visit Merrywalks, the mushrooms are not yet ready for sale. However Stroudco is looking forward to supplying Oyster and Shiitake mushrooms from Fungusloci in the near future – watch this space! In the meantime you can buy regular white, brown and portabella mushrooms from Stroudco which should keep us going until the first Oysters are ready to sample.
To browse the full range of local produce available on Stroudco Food Hub or to download a catalogue go to www.stroudco.org.uk
Nick Weir

About Philip

Director and Co-Founder of Stroud Community TV

One Response to “Fungusloci in Stroud; growing mushrooms in coffee grounds!”

  1. Maria Fischer

    31. Mar, 2016

    Amazing! I love this project.

    Reply to this comment

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